Henrico County Public Schools expresses a divisionwide commitment to every student by communicating a vision of inclusiveness: “The right to achieve. The support to succeed.” The school division also embraces four critical cornerstones: Student Safety, Academic Progress, Closing Gaps and Relationships.

The school system serves the families of Henrico County, Virginia, a diverse community of more than 320,000 which wraps west, north and east of the independent city and state capital of Richmond. Henrico is Virginia’s fifth-most populous county.

HCPS is the sixth largest public school division in Virginia, and is comprised of 72 schools and program centers serving more than 50,000 students. The division’s schools reflect the geographic diversity of Henrico County, and lie in bustling near-urban and suburban settings; small towns; and quiet rural areas. Click here to view a map of the school division.

Dr. Amy E. Cashwell became superintendent of Henrico County Public Schools in July of 2018. A longtime educator, Cashwell comes to Henrico with a wealth of experience and a passion for public education.

The five-member Henrico School Board consists of one elected representative from each of Henrico County’s five magisterial districts. The Board elects a chair and vice-chair from within its ranks. The Board holds its monthly meetings and work sessions at the New Bridge Auditorium, 5915 Nine Mile Road, Henrico 23223.

Academic excellence and opportunity are hallmarks of Henrico County Public Schools. Twenty-three division schools earned 2017 Virginia Index of Performance awards for advanced learning and achievement, presented by Gov. Terry McAuliffe and the Virginia Board of Education. HCPS was again tops in the Richmond region with the most schools earning the distinction. Short Pump Middle School was one of only nine schools in the commonwealth to earn the highest designation.

In 2017-18, six more HCPS schools regained full state accreditation, bringing to 10 the number of Henrico County schools regaining full accreditation in the past two years. And to keep the momentum going, all other fully accredited Henrico County schools maintained their top ratings. The number of fully accredited schools in Henrico is at a five-year high.

HCPS also leads central Virginia in teachers certified by the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards. Completion of the rigorous process is the profession’s highest mark of accomplishment.

Henrico Schools has robust programs and support services for families of students with special needs; gifted students; homebound and homeschooled students; and students learning English as a second language.

Each of the division’s high schools is fully accredited and hosts an academic specialty center. The specialty centers allow students with clear interests the chance to focus on a preferred area, such as engineering, the arts or world languages. Three middle schools offer the International Baccalaureate Middle Years program and two high schools offer the International Baccalaureate Diploma program.

The division also has cutting-edge programs in career and technical education, at individual schools and at two Advanced Career Education centers. From learning about sustainable seafood in culinary arts classes to applying technology concepts at Richmond Raceway, HCPS’ Department of Career and Technical Education helps students become effective participants in the international economy.

In 2015, HCPS adopted a three-year strategic plan. The plan’s goals for improvement mirror the division’s four areas of focus: Student Safety, Academic Progress, Closing Gaps and Relationships. 

How does HCPS know if it’s meeting the goals of the strategic plan? One way is by asking our stakeholders. Every two years, parents, students, HCPS employees and business leaders are invited to give their views on what Henrico Schools is doing well and what the division could do better. Click here to see the results of the 2016 stakeholder surveys and focus groups.

From academics to athletics, from the arts to career skills, Henrico County Public Schools is proud to be part of helping our community thrive by ensuring that each child has the right to achieve and the support to succeed.

Henrico Schools a national, state leader

From academics to athletics to the arts, HCPS raising the bar
  • The National School Boards Association recognized HCPS for a sweeping overhaul of the school division’s approach to student supports. HCPS was one of five large U.S. school systems recognized with a first-place honor in the 2017 Magna Awards. The award recognizes Henrico Schools’ efforts of the past several years, from re-examining its policies in remaking its Code of Conduct to implementing more support systems.
  • Twenty-four Henrico County schools earned 2017 Virginia Index of Performance awards for advanced learning and achievement, presented by Gov. Terry McAuliffe and the Virginia Board of Education. HCPS was again tops in the Richmond region with the most schools earning the distinction. Short Pump Middle School was one of only nine schools in the commonwealth to earn the highest designation.
  • U.S. News & World Report ranked four Henrico high schools among America’s best. The magazine includ-ed Deep Run, Glen Allen, Mills Godwin and Douglas Freeman high schools in its annual “Best High Schools” re-port. Deep Run was the No. 11-ranked high school in Virginia. Glen Allen, Mills Godwin and Douglas Freeman were Nos. 16, 27 and 34, respectively. Henrico’s total of four ranked schools was the most in Central Virginia, and Deep Run was the highest ranked school in the region.
  • More than 1,400 HCPS students participated in competitions coordinated by Special Olympics Virginia. The three competitions – Little Feet Meet, Meet in the Middle and Big Feet Meet – span grade levels from K-12 and seek to give students with and without intellectual disabilities the opportunity to train together, to create friendships and to foster mutual respect.
  • Three athletic teams at HCPS high schools won Virginia state titles in 2016-17: Deep Run’s boys’ golf and cross country teams won state titles, and Highland Springs’ football team repeated as state football champions.
  • Deep Run H.S. was awarded the 2016-17 Virginia High School League Wells Fargo Cup, the highest award given by the VHSL. The cup goes annually to the school in each classification achieving the best over-all record in state-level competitions in 27 sports – the “state champions’ state champion.”
  • Highland Springs High School read the most books among Henrico County high schools to win the 2016-17 “Reading and Writing Across the Curriculum Challenge.” Springers read a total of 12,941 books during the 2016-17 school year. The challenge is part of HCPS’ intense concentration on literacy as one of its areas of focus. The contest is designed to increase reading and writing across the curriculum, in courses rang-ing from English and history to art and health. Students electronically logged the books they read.
  • The National Association of Counties recognized nine innovative HCPS programs with 2017 NACo Achievement Awards. Among the programs receiving awards were Career and Technical Education’s unique partnership with the company filming the award-winning movie, “Loving.” Also recognized were innovative programs in web development; digital citizenship; community health education; summer preschool; refur-bishing computers for the community; revamping lunch schedules to accommodate more tutoring and re-medial education; involving students in renovating baseball facilities; and adopting a new digital learning platform.
  • Moody Middle School student Tejas Muthusamy made his final Scripps National Spelling Bee the best of his career. The four-time HCPS spelling champion finished tied for fifth nationally in the ESPN-televised contest, of the 291 regional champions. His final bee was the eighth-grader’s third top-10 finish. He finished eighth in the nation in 2014 and seventh in 2015.
  • For the 18th year in a row, the National Association of Music Merchants named HCPS one of America’s “Best Communities for Music Education” for its commitment to music instruction. HCPS has earned the designation each year of the awards’ existence.

Video: We are Henrico Schools

Just the Facts

Schools & Centers

Elementary…………………………………………46
Middle………………………………………………..12
High……………………………………………………9
Advanced Career Education
(ACE) Centers………………………………………2
Alternative Program Centers………………….3
Total Schools and Centers……………………..72

Students

Elementary…………………….22,634
Middle……………………………11,873
High……………………………….15,350
Other………………………………….473
Total Students…………………50,330

Graduates

Total 2017 Graduates…………………….3494
On-Time 2017 Graduation Rate….91.1%
Plans to Continue Education………83.4%
Scholarships Accepted…….$26.6 Million

Student Diversity

African American………………………..35%
Asian………………………………………….11%
Caucasian……………………………………39%
Hispanic……………………………………..10%
Other…………………………………………..5%
Economic Deprivation…………………..40.63%

Pupil/Teacher Ratios

Elementary…………………………………..19.9
Middle………………………………………….22.6
High……………………………………………..22.5

Employees

Total Teachers…………………………….3,917
Total Employees (FTE)………………..6,857

Finance 2017-18

Operating Budget……………………….$577.2 Million
Per Pupil Expenditure…………………$10,563
(Data as of November 2017)